108 search results for society

Legacy Society
https://www.danforthcenter.org/support/individual-giving-societies/legacy-society
Legacy Society, Home, 39 North Innovation District Plan Unveiled Legacy Society The Danforth Legacy Society recognizes individuals who, through a bequest, annuity, or other planned gift, have made, that you can at the lowest possible cost Or to join the Danforth Legacy Society, please contact Tom Bander in the Office of Development at 314-587-1235 The Danforth Legacy Society is made possible
Danforth Society
https://www.danforthcenter.org/support/individual-giving-societies/danforth-society
Danforth Society, Home Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Instagram Flickr YouTube RSS, 39 North Innovation District Plan Unveiled The Donald Danforth Society Membership in the Donald Danforth Society is a special honor that celebrates the generosity, $1,000 - $2,499 To become a Danforth Society member, click here
Danforth Center Scientist Receives Awards from American Society of Plant Biologists
https://www.danforthcenter.org/scientists-research/principal-investigators/blake-meyers/lab-news/danforth-center-scientist-receives-awards-from-american-society-of-plant-biologists
Blake Meyers is the 2017 Recipient of the Charles Albert Shull Award
Danforth Center Scientist Receives Awards from American Society of Plant Biologists, Blake Meyers, – The American Society of Plant Biologists (ASPB), a professional society devoted to the advancement, . The award was initiated in 1971 by the Society to honor Dr. Charles A. Shull, whose personal interest and support were largely responsible for the founding and early growth of the Society. “I'm thrilled, and the Society,” stated Meyers. “I'd like to acknowledge my past and present lab members and our
Danforth Center Intern Given Botanical Society of America’s 2016 Young Botanist Award
https://www.danforthcenter.org/news-media/roots-shoots-blog/blog-item/danforth-center-intern-given-botanical-society-of-america-s-2016-young-botanist-award
Congratulations to Rebecca Valls on her recent award!
Danforth Center Intern Given Botanical Society of America’s 2016 Young Botanist Award, Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) intern, Rebecca Valls spent the summer of 2015 working in the Baxter Lab studying the effects of differing pH treatments on the ionome (the mineral nutrient, .” Recently, Valls was given the “Certificate of Special Achievement” for the Botanical Society, in the Botanical Society of America. To be considered for the Young Botanist Award, Valls’ undergraduate
(Genetics Society of America) On the origin of germ cells
https://www.danforthcenter.org/news-media/in-the-news/in-the-news-item/(genetics-society-of-america)-on-the-origin-of-germ-cells
This system offers a unique opportunity to explore the early evolution of germ cells.
(Genetics Society of America) On the origin of germ cells, Genes to Genomes features research by Gavriel Matt from Jim Umen’s lab on the green alga, Volvox carteri READ MORE, (Collection), (Collection)
(Crop Science Society of America) Sayonara, Kudzu Bug?
https://www.danforthcenter.org/news-media/in-the-news/in-the-news-item/(crop-science-society-of-america)-sayonara-kudzu-bug
Adam Bray, graduate student in the Topp Lab at the Danforth Center has spent a lot of time with kudzu bugs. He is researching the bug’s destruction of soybeans and how to protect the crop. 
(Crop Science Society of America) Sayonara, Kudzu Bug?, The kudzu bug originated in east Asia and India and showed up in Georgia, Bray’s home state, in 2009. And like its viney plant namesake, the kudzu bug has earned a negative reputation. Kudzu bug on soyKudzu bugs pierce the stems of soybean plants. In 2004, farmers applied 771 metric tons of insecticides on soybean plants to keep the pests under control. Photo credit Adam Bray.“Everybody in Georgia knows about the kudzu bug,” Bray says
(Soil Science Society of America) To Bear or Not to Bear a Seed
https://www.danforthcenter.org/news-media/in-the-news/in-the-news-item/(soil-science-society-of-america)-to-bear-or-not-to-bear-a-seed
Toby Kellogg’s study of wild grasses that are relatives of sorghum and produce non-seed bearing flowers could help plant breeders increase yield in cultivated sorghum.
(Soil Science Society of America) To Bear or Not to Bear a Seed, Toby Kellogg’s study of wild grasses that are relatives of sorghum and produce non-seed bearing flowers could help plant breeders increase yield in cultivated sorghum. READ MORE, (Collection), (Collection)
Meet 13th Annual Fall Symposium Speaker: Dr. David Baulcombe
~/news-media/roots-shoots-blog/blog-item/Meet-13th-Annual-Fall-Symposium-Speaker:-Dr.-David-Baulcombe
Illumina Lecture presented by, Professor Sir David Baulcombe, Regius Professor of Botany, Royal Society Research Professor, Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge.   "RNA silencing and heritable epigenetic effects in tomato and ...
by, Professor Sir David Baulcombe, Regius Professor of Botany, Royal Society Research Professor, Department, University as Royal Society Research Professor and now as Regi us Professor of Botany. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society and a foreign associate member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences. His awards include the 2006 Royal Medal of the Royal Society, the 20 08 Lasker Award for basic biomedical, chaired a Royal Society policy study on the contribution of biological science to food crop
TEDx Talk by Dr. Jim Carrington
https://www.danforthcenter.org/news-media/roots-shoots-blog/blog-item/tedx-talk-by-dr.-jim-carrington

In his recent talk, “The Science in Our Food,” Dr. Jim Carrington, president of the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, discusses our Grand Challenge to sustainably provide food security for a growing, changing world while also preserving natural resources and environmental integrity.  Jim makes the case that we cannot meet this challenge without new science and nature-compatible technology.

Award from the National Science Foundation, the Ruth Allen Award from the American Society, of the American Academy of Microbiology, the American Phytopathological Society, and the American
(Science) Plant Scientists: GM Technology is Safe
https://www.danforthcenter.org/news-media/in-the-news/in-the-news-item/(science)-plant-scientists-gm-technology-is-safe
Danforth Center scientists Rebecca Bart and Noah Fahlgren are among the authors of the letter published in the journal Science
(Science) Plant Scientists: GM Technology is Safe, The American Society of Plant Biologists (ASPB) “supports the continued responsible use of genetic engineering… as an effective tool for advancing food security and reducing the negative environmental impacts of agriculture” (1). A recent petition advocating the ASPB position collected more than 1400 signatories from the plant science community (2). The ASPB, the petition signatories, and other scientists in governmental and scientific